India: Disappearing daughters

 

IUnited Nations, New York, July 2009 - An epidemic is wiping out India's daughters. It's not a disease or famine - it's parents deciding not to have baby girls. This disturbing trend is not new but modern science is enabling it, with disastrous results for India's future.

Petals in the Dust: The Endangered Indian Girls Documentary Film - Trailer

 

Documentary film that interweaves stories of girls and women who are victims of discrimination, violence and "gendercide" in India. It also highlights women who have fought to keep their daughters alive and activists and grassroots organizations that are working to empower girls and women and end the cycle of violence.

 

Check the website www.petalsinthedust.com/

 

Disappearing Daughters: India's Female Feticide

 

Every 12 seconds, a baby girl is aborted in India. That's about 7,000 girls killed every day just because they are females. The United Nations now calls India the most dangerous place on earth for a girl.Abortion is legal in India. Sex-selective abortion, however, is illegal but widely common.

COUNTRY REPORTS: INDIA

 

Our countries report section is comprised of reports, articles and other information related to gendercide and the targeted country. The United Nations now calls India the most dangerous place on earth for a girl.

ARTICLES OF INTEREST:                                                                                              

2004

In spite of modernization and women's increasing role in the market economy, the practice of the dowry in India is becoming more widespread, and the value of dowries is increasing. There are many well-documented adverse consequences of the dowry system, particularly for women. This is a study of attitudes toward the dowry system among married women in the northern province of Bihar (N= 4,603), in which the dowry has strong roots in tradition. Hypotheses regarding antecedents involving attachment to tradition, exposure to modernizing influences, and self-interest were developed. Each set of factors has some effects, and nearly two thirds of the women in the survey disapprove of the dowry. The practice may be quite resistant to change, however, because its social and economic consequences carry tangible benefits in an increasingly materialistic culture.

April 22, 2013

A campaign has been jointly launched by the Ministry of Health and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in Vietnam, in an effort to better cope with the country’s alarming sex imbalance at birth.
 

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March 7, 2014

Abstract:

‘Honour Killing’ is a cultural crime or a cultural tradition prevalent amongst non-Caucasian Societies which perceive women as bearers of family honour. Indian cultures are very deep rooted. Many young people in India have been done to death every year owing to ‘Honour Killings.’ It is because so called honour killings are based on the belief, deeply rooted in Indian cultures, which consider the women as objects and commodities, and not as human beings endowed with dignity and rights. Most honour killings occur in countries like India where the concept of women is considered as a vessel of the family reputation. This paper is an attempt to tackle the very important issue of a cultural crime that is magnifying day by day like a monster untamed. It is hard to believe that in the 21st century that too in the largest democracy of the world, families murder their kith and kin for allegedly saving their honour. But the question to be asked is this, is there any honour is killing? The concept of law that each man may do what he likes, provided he does not injure the equal freedom of others has been central to legal theory. As conditions of existence vary among different peoples and times, so do the principles of ethics and law. In any society there is a close connection between social morality and the legal order. There cannot be and there never has been a complete separation of law and morality. Historically ad ideological orders are observed into the legal order. And while in the traditional more or less custom bound society the flow was essentially in one direction the gradual transformation of social behaviour into legal custom and from custom into legislative prescription in the contemporary highly articulate and organized society, the law becomes in turn increasingly a major factor in the formation of social morality. However, there are times where the rule of law has been over ridden to give way to arbitrary and often violent actions by the society in order to preserve morality or honour of the clan.Every year around the world an increasing number of women are killed in the name of honour. Relatives, usually male, commit acts of violence against wives, sisters, daughters and mothers to reclaim their family honour from real or suspected actions that are perceived to have compromised it. Due to discriminator social beliefs and extremist views of gender, officials often condone or ignore the use of torture and brutality against women. As a result, the majority of so called honour killings so unreported and perpetrators face little, if any, consequence.

September 2013

Abstract- Gender imbalance may arise as a consequence of various factors ranging from natural factors and war casualties to intentional gender control and deliberate gendercide. Human sex ratios, either at birth or in the population as a whole, might be quoted in any of four ways: the ratio of males to females, the ratio of females to males, the proportion of males, or the proportion of females. If there are 108,000 males and 100,000 females, the ratio would be quoted as 1.080.

Oct. 31, 2013

The fact that techniques of prenatal diagnosis are used in India and China to selectively eliminate females is widely known. It has been extensively reported in the international media and in scientific publications since the 1990s. The publication of the Census of India 2011 shows that the ratio of girls to boys below the age of 6 years continues to decline at an alarming rate. Following that publication, this topic has again received international attention. The aim of this article is to better inform the human genetics community of the magnitude of this practice and its consequences in India.In this overview, we examine the impact of prenatal technology on the sex ratio in India. We present facts and figures from the Census of India and other publications that show that the practice is wide spread throughout India, in urban and rural areas, among the rich and the poor, and among the educated and the illiterate. We also briefly discuss the possible causes, consequences, and solutions.

April 16, 2013 Researcher: Ms. Meredith McBride

Objective:

Inform the UN Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences; on violence against women in India pending the Rapporteur's visit to the country.

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September 5, 2012

In spite of modernization and women's increasing role in the market economy, the practice of the dowry in India is becoming more widespread, and the value of dowries is increasing. There are many well-documented adverse consequences of the dowry system, particularly for women. This is a study of attitudes toward the dowry system among married women in the northern province of Bihar (N= 4,603), in which the dowry has strong roots in tradition. Hypotheses regarding antecedents involving attachment to tradition, exposure to modernizing influences, and self-interest were developed. Each set of factors has some effects, and nearly two thirds of the women in the survey disapprove of the dowry. The practice may be quite resistant to change, however, because its social and economic consequences carry tangible benefits in an increasingly materialistic culture.

TBD

March 15, 2013

TBD

April 22, 2013

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December 27, 2010

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TBD

March 15, 2013

TBD

April 22, 2013

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ARTICLES 2010                                                                                                            

Indian girls between the ages of 1-5 are 75% more likely to die than a boy of the same age.

UN Department of Economic and Social affairs (2012)

Over 8% of girls born in the country died before their first birthday.

Indian Child’s Rights Organisation (CRY)